December 12, 2017

Helping PR pros make smarter decisions

Conversation Starters (And Other PR Blog Jots)

Conversation Starters (And Other PR Blog Jots)

Got Comments?
Neville Hobson
I’ve been seeing lots of great “advice” posts on some of my favorite PR blog reads lately, so I thought I would lead today’s jots with Neville’s great post on encouraging feedback on your blog. We all like to receive comments, the give and take is part of the fun of engaging in social media. Neville offers pointers on improving your post to comment ratio. “If you see people beginning to comment on a post you’ve written, join in the embryonic conversation as well. Add your own comments, not only to provide your additional viewpoint but also to show you want to actively engage with your readers. It’s the equivalent of a conversation. And it’s one way community starts building.”

Seven Ten Deadly (Agency) Sins
Conversation Agent

There has been a lot of discussion of late regarding the relationship (the good and the bad) between agencies and new media. Valeria Maltoni offers up her choices for the top ten wrose sins committed by agencies. “Focusing too much on your process and not enough on the client’s business. This may be true especially in a B2B model. I am reminded that businesses are made of people, too. A deep knowledge of the industry’s sales cycle, buyers’ behaviors, and products/services goes a long way to create a communication piece that works. An ad is (or should be) a
communication piece.”

Grammer Nerds Beware
Copyblogger
The thought of deliberately misspelling a word or butchering a well-known phrase makes me  recoil in horror, but Neck Cernis might be onto something here. We all know that you are more likely to attract bigger traffic if you write something controversial, and the same concept applies here–by confusing your readers with typos, you just might draw them in. Not that I can bring myself to actually DO this, mind you. “The power of misquoting comes almost entirely from the disruption of your reader’s thought process. This is a concept central to the gentle art of persuasion, and one that can make your writing all the more convincing. Boom! And then they’re hooked.”

Princely PR Stunt?
PR Studies
Now that Prince Harry’s efforts in Afghanistan have been exposed, along with the media’s cooperation to not disclose this information (eventually revealed on the Drudge Report), the backlash has begun. Richard Bailey reports on the accusations that the young royal’s service in the Middle East has been nothing but an elaborate PR hoax. “Some journalists will continue to lament the growing influence of PR (one of the themes of the Nick Davies book); but most of us can accept that everyone’s ‘on the game’. This is also a challenge to university courses teaching the subject, which may struggle to distinguish professional and ethical PR from Max Clifford-style publicity stunts or do-it-yourself ‘citizen PR’.”

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