April 26, 2017

Helping PR pros make smarter decisions

Radio Roundtable: FB down, PRs & Blogger outreach (sigh), and when not to complain

Radio Roundtable: FB down, PRs & Blogger outreach (sigh), and when not to complain

This week on Media Bullseye’s Radio Roundtable Jen Zingsheim is joined by co-host Doug Haslam. The two discuss the mass hysteria created by Facebook’s recent outages, the ongoing problems surrounding PR and blogger outreach, and some recent examples of businesses reacting badly to negative social media content.

Click here to listen to the 30-minute program.

  • First, Jen and Doug discuss the recent Facebook outages, and examine what this means for businesses. Doug points out that this should be a wake up call to any business considering abandoning a website for Facebook: if you don’t own your platform, you are over-relying on a third party–and he makes the very smart point that you need to make sure you are backed up to a platform you manage. Jen mentions a recent post on TechDirt that makes the point that even if you aren’t a paying customer, expectations matter; this applies to Facebook users too.
  • Next, the perennial issue of PR and blogger outreach has once again surfaced, only this time it isn’t about bad pitches, it’s instead focused on another aspect of slap-dash PR work: focusing too much on the A-listers, not enough on the most logical outreach targets. The post at Spin Sucks takes on this and other bad habits of the PR set, including, according to the post, directions from PR pros to bloggers on what to write about. Doug wonders if PR pros are providing bloggers with standard key messages or talking points–which are provided as background–and this is being misinterpreted as telling the bloggers what to write about. At least, that’s what he and Jen *hope* is happening because by this point any PR pro out there should know better than to tell a blogger what to write about.
  • Finally, they discuss some…interesting business responses to negative online content. Specifically, an employee at Price Chopper calling the employer of someone who posted a mildly negative tweet to complain about the person, and then a hotel who threw out a couple based on a negative review posted to TripAdvisor. Doug points out that maybe one should complete the stay/trip/whatever before complaining about a hotel–not only in an effort to view the service in its entirety, but also to, well, avoid getting tossed from the hotel. Jen points out that the Price Chopper incident is yet another reminder that social media guidelines should be discussed with everyone at a company, since in this instance a Price Chopper employee did act without the “knowledge of our consumer insights people or my direct supervisor, the Vice President of Public Relations and Consumer and Marketing Services.”
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