April 30, 2017

Helping PR pros make smarter decisions

Radio Roundtable: Congrats! You’re a spokesmodel, deleting content to correct the record, and Facebook use in the loo.

Radio Roundtable: Congrats! You’re a spokesmodel, deleting content to correct the record, and Facebook use in the loo.

This week, Jen Zingsheim is joined by Doug Haslam of Voce Communications. The two discuss Facebook’s new advertising venture, the logic and ethics of deleting content–whether articles or Tweets–to correct the record, and a recent survey showing that many can’t leave Facebook alone for a minute. Not one minute.

[powerpress]

This week’s show is 27-minutes in length.

  • First, the two discuss Facebook’s new ad feature that turns “likes” into advertisements. Doug points out that there are, of course, potential privacy ramifications of moving forward with this. Jen expresses displeasure at the idea of “forced” word-of-mouth, as this takes the voluntary aspect of sharing what you are a fan of with your friends and automating it. Doug points out that there has been a distinct *lack* of outrage on this new rollout; Jen wonders if it’s because there aren’t any immediately identifiable stories like the examples that happened surrounding Beacon, or maybe Facebook has just beaten us all down.
  • Next, the two move on to the sticky topic of whether a news organization should delete incorrect information to correct the record, particularly on Twitter where incorrect information can spread quickly. The issue arose out of NPR’s incorrect Tweeting that Representative Gabrielle Giffords had passed away following the shooting in Tuscon–a Tweet that spread quickly–and was quickly proven false. The question soon arose: should the Tweet have been deleted? Social media purists will usually advocate correcting the record rather than deleting. Doug points out that blogs have the ability to use “strike-through” font, which is not available to Tweets. Doug also notes that Salon has elected to remove a story it ran a few years ago on the vaccines/autism controversy; the publication notes that leaving the article up has the potential to “do real harm.”
  • Finally, Jen and Doug talk about an AIS Media survey that shows 27 percent of Facebook users admit to using Facebook while in the bathroom. Jen can’t quite believe anyone could be that addicted to Facebook, while Doug thinks the number is probably on the low side.
Ad Block 728

About The Author

Related posts

Ad Block 728