April 27, 2017

Helping PR pros make smarter decisions

Radio Roundtable: ROI, Twitter Bullies, Journos tracking Tweets, and Employers asking for FB passwords.

Radio Roundtable: ROI, Twitter Bullies, Journos tracking Tweets, and Employers asking for FB passwords.

This week, Jen Zingsheim is joined by co-host Doug Haslam of Voce Communications (a Porter Novelli company!). The two discussed social media ROI, Twitter bullies (Twibullies? Sound too much like tabouli?), journalists using metrics to track and shape Tweets, and the case of a Maryland man who was asked for his Facebook password…as part of his job interview process.

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This week’s program is 30 minutes in length.

  • First, Jen and Doug discuss Beth Harte’s very interesting piece on Social Media ROI…and how some companies are asking for the ROI up front, before implementing a program. Jen finds this a bit weird, and perhaps a stalling tactic. Doug notes that ROI is a slippery number to begin with, and that the numbers are different for everybody making it a hard calculation sometimes. Doug points out that this is the reason people ask for case studies, which are coming, albeit slowly.
  • Next, the two talk about Twitter bullies, starting the discussion by looking at a piece by an Australian journalist, who called out people who were highly critical of a new television show–and the push back on this by Mike Doman in a guest post on Waxing UnLyrical. This led to a more general discussion on the role of online anonymity, and where it is useful and valid, and where it is destructive and harmful.  Doug points out that some online communities have regular commenters who use pseudonyms that become well-known characters, which is accepted. Jen points out that a lot depends on the person: some are responsible and will post under a fake name in a balanced way, and there are others who hide behind fake names to say things they wouldn’t if their names were attached.
  • Journalists are now using URL-shortening services to track the success of Tweets they post–and Jen and Doug both think this is great. Doug points out that it makes sense to track and see how people respond to stories, which ones get the “click-through” when Tweeted out. Doug circles this discussion back to ROI: it’s important to track the effect.
  • Finally, The Atlantic carries the story of a man asked for his Facebook account and password as part of his job interview process for the Maryland Department of Corrections. Both Jen and Doug agree that this seems to be an overstep on the part of the potential employer; while there could be high-security clearance jobs that might require this level of scrutiny, it appears to be overreach and invasive for this position. Doug states that almost every job requires some level of discretion: you’ve always had to make sure employees understand that–whether it is Facebook or a cocktail party.

 

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