April 26, 2017

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The Jobs Jots – Social Media Bloggers React to Steve Jobs’ Retirement

The Jobs Jots – Social Media Bloggers React to Steve Jobs’ Retirement

It doesn’t matter if you’re the world’s biggest Apple fanboy/fangirl or the most devout PC devotee in the world—no one can deny the influence of Steve Jobs. Which is why last weeks’ earthquake wasn’t the only thing causing aftershocks (you didn’t think I’d let the week end without an earthquake pun, did you?). Indeed, it seems that Jobs is stepping down from his position as CEO at Apple, and the blogosphere sure did have a lot to say on the matter.

Appropriately, I’m dedicating this week’s Jots entirely to the Jobs departure. The Jobs Jots consist of some of the best reactions to this week’s announcement from around the PR/social media blogosphere. Have some thoughts of your own to share? Have at it in the comments!

Steve – Mitch Joel – In a heartfelt post, Mitch compares Apple products to rock bands, and he’s right. There was always something exciting about when Apple had an announcement to make. I still remember the first time I saw the announcement of the iPhone prior to its launch a few years back. I wasn’t even an Apple-phile at the time, and I went gaga. Mitch gives Jobs the credit for creating this type of feelings in technology consumers, and shares his personal thoughts. “I’ve been down about the news that Steve Jobs has resigned from Apple. As a business owner and entrepreneur, I know that the business will roll on and that Apple will continue to innovate and change how we use technology and media. I too marvel at everything that Apple has accomplished under Jobs’ command, but I’m more down about how somber and morbid both the news analysis and punditry is. Most of the media reads like an obituary. I’m down because I can’t imagine what it took for Jobs to write that letter of resignation. To be at the point where he feels like he can’t complete his daily duties. It’s sad. Not because the world needs more iPhones. It’s sad because I’m sure he still wants to go to work every day, to think about what his customers might not even know that they want and to push people (and himself) to create the future (or, as he says, make a dent in the universe.”).”

Steve Jobs – Valeria Maltoni – In a very interesting, must-read post, Valeria posts some “vintage” Jobs wisdom, and points out that his impact goes far, far beyond the current hipster-nerd obsession with the iPhone and iPad. As a CEO, he was one of a kind.  “You will find evidence of Steve Jobs’ impact on Apple not just in the recently discussed company balance sheet, nor in its stock price. His influence has had much deeper ramifications in the community of users and developers, the city of Cupertino, the company’s employees, partners, etc. Probably what Jobs calls the community in his letter. Does your CEO get these kinds of birthday cards? Anyone?”

Steve Jobs Breaks the No News Cycle – Geoff Livingston – In his post, Geoff points out that if nothing else the Jobs departure broke the monotony of endless Google+ blog posts—that is, it gave us something to talk about! (And, how!) He also compares Jobs to that other computer guru: Bill Gates. “The Jobs departure is similar in stature to Bill Gates leaving Microsoft. A true industry titan, Jobs has had a critical role in shaping the U.S. technology in three critical phases — the PC revolution, the .com era, and again in the 2.0 era. And like Gates and Microsoft, it is unlikely that Apple will be the same.”

Steve Jobs: A mega, meta appreciation – Adam Penenberg – An absolutely epic post with links to dozens of Jobs-related posts from around the web. If you want to get lost in links all day to honor the glory of Jobs, look no further than Adam’s impressive collection! Well done, sir. (A sentiment that can also apply to Jobs himself.) “Because nobody’s changed the world as well as Jobs. While his resignation as chief executive officer of Apple is the end of an extraordinary era, not just for Apple, but for the global technology industry in general, we should note his very own words, because they reveal what drives this inscrutable man: ‘Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only way to be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle.’”

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